GADS Reporting for Wind

by ronfluegge 27. March 2018 15:05

The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) is phasing in mandatory quarterly GADS-W reporting requirements over three years for wind plants with an installed capacity over 75 MW and a commissioning date of January 1, 2005 or later. Plants with a capacity of over 200 MW started reporting on January 1, 2018 with 100 MW and 75 MW sites required to begin reporting on January 1, 2019 and January 1, 2020, respectively. 

The quarterly GADS-W reporting consists of submitting three reports: 

  1. Sub-Group: consists mainly of site characteristics, location, and equipment information 
  2. Performance: general site performance, including unavailability (forced, maintenance, or planned) for reasons outside of management control 
  3. Component Outage: identifies the general area of reason for the loss of production using a list of component (system) codes to ensure consistency in reporting 

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General

A Short History of NERC GADS

by ronfluegge 7. October 2017 17:50

1979 ⎯  NERC assumes responsibility for collecting and analyzing generator availability data from the Edison Electric Institute’s (EEI) Prime Movers Committee. NERC, with support from the Electric Power Institute, restructures EEI’s Equipment Availability Data Reporting System to create the Generating Availability Data System (GADS). 

1990 ⎯  Congress passes the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. NERC uses the GADS database to provide the Energy Information Administration with a summary of forced and planned outages in the 1985−87 period. EPA uses the GADS data to set generator unit emission allocation values.

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General

Cybersecurity Insurance

by ronfluegge 27. April 2017 15:25

Cybersecurity insurance is a contract that an individual or entity can purchase to help reduce the financial risks associated with doing business online. In exchange for a monthly or quarterly fee, the insurance policy transfers some of the risk to the insurer.

Many companies purchase cybersecurity insurance policies to cover extra expenditures that could result from the physical destruction or theft of digital assets. Such expenditures typically include the cost of notifying customers that a security event has incurred, as well as the cost of regulatory fines.

To qualify for coverage, the individual or entity typically has to submit to a security audit by the insurance company or provide documentation with the assistance of an approved assessment tool, such as that offered by the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council.

Many cybersecurity insurance policies only cover first-party losses to a company. Some policies, however, may also cover third-party liability losses.

Depending upon the price of the policy, coverage may include first and/or third-party liability for cyberextortion, costs associated with strengthening data security, damages due to corrupt or missing data, damages due to inoperable hardware or software and monetary loss from theft or lost business.

Because coverage is not often for the total amount of damages, many companies choose to buy additional insurance to cover amounts beyond which a cybersecurity policy covers. 


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