GADS/OS Wind Data Entry / Analysis & Reporting

by ronfluegge 17. December 2016 17:02

Our development team has a long-term track record of providing industry software based upon best practice analysis and RAM metrics (Reliability, Availability and Maintainability) for the conventional power market. Our team is finalizing software that will be available to the wind industry during the 1st quarter of 2017.

The result is the GADS/OS Wind - setting a new standard in Wind Industry GADS data collection, analysis and reporting.

GADS/OS Wind allows you to collect and report validated data as specified in the GADS Wind Turbine Generation (GADS‐W) ‐ Data Reporting Instructions (DRI) Version: 1.2 (Revision Date: 09/30/2016 - Effective Date: 01/01/2017). The NERC DRI was developed to assist plant personnel in reporting information to NERC’s GADS Wind Reporting application. The instructions detail the procedures, schedule, and format to follow when reporting data. Our GADS/OS Wind software complies with the latest requirements.

If you have existing software to collect GADS wind data, now is the time to ensure that it complies with DRI Version: 1.2 (Revision Date: 09/30/2016 - Effective Date: 01/01/2017).

The delivery date is driven by the NERC staff's completion of the Wind DRI and the NERC web application that data will be uploaded to. NERC’s go-live date for their Wind software data upload process and implementation target is the end of January 2017. Afterwards, our team will be given access to test our software against the NERC upload process and to make any changes required.

As a result of the testing on both sides, there will not be an update of the NERC Wind DRI until Q2 2017 which may require that our GADS/OS Wind software be updated again to meet any new or additional requirements.

Our goal is to release a completely tested application that meets NERC's requirements and minimizes the impact on our users -- we do the testing; not our users.

Taco Bell programming

by ronfluegge 8. December 2016 16:14

Taco Bell programming is an approach to software development that places value on consistently using the same standard development tools and languages to solve problems. The approach gets its name from the way the Taco Bell fast food restaurant combines the same limited number of ingredients in different ways to create all its menu items.

While some software developers think it's important to keep up with the latest software development tools and languages, the philosophy behind Taco Bell programming flies in the face of this notion. The mindset of a Taco Bell programmer is that almost every problem in software development has been encountered and solved in the past, so its more efficient to use what the programmer already knows well and solve the problem quickly even if its at the cost of style.

The idea of using Taco Bell in a programming analogy is credited to Ted Dziuba, who coined the term in a blog post he wrote in 2010. According to Dziubu, each time a new programming language, third-party service or line of code is used, it introduces the possibility of failure. In contrast, fixing problems Taco Bell style with a well-proven tool set, saves time in development, testing, training and meetings.

Tags:

General

FRCP Rule 41

by ronfluegge 30. November 2016 14:26

FRPC Rule 41 is the part of the United States Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure that covers the search and seizure of physical and digital evidence.

Rule 41 originally granted a federal judge magistrate the authority to issue a warrant to search and seize a person or property located within that judge's district if the person or property is part of a criminal investigation or trial. In April 2016, the Judicial Conference of the United States proposed an amendment to Rule 41 that allows a federal judge magistrate to issue a warrant that allows an investigator to gain remote access to a digital device suspected in a crime, even if the device is located outside of the geographic jurisdiction of the judge issuing the warrant.

Following standard protocol for changes to federal rules, the Supreme Court passed the approved proposal on to Congress, and Congress was given until December 1, 2016 to allow or disallow the proposed changes. An important goal of the amendment to Rule 41 is to prevent criminals from hiding the location of a computing device with anonymization technology in order to make detection and prosecution more difficult.

Privacy advocates are concerned that the amendment will expand the government's authority to legally hack individuals and organizations and monitor any computer suspected of being part of a botnet. In addition to giving the government the authority to seize or copy the information on a digital device no matter where that device is located, the amendment also allows investigators who are investigating a crime that spans five or more judicial districts to go to one judge for warrants instead of having to request warrants from judges in each jurisdiction.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, the American Civil Liberties Union and more than 50 technology companies -- including Google and PayPal -- opposed the amendment and have urged Congress to carefully examine the constitutional, legal and geopoliticial ramifications of the amendment to Rule 41 before granting approval.

Tags:

General


Welcome to the GADS Open Source blog!

This will be an easy place to keep up on updates and news related to GADS and the GADS Open Source software.

Check out the FAQ section below as well.