Data sovereignty

by ronfluegge 12. March 2018 14:27

Data sovereignty is the concept that information which has been converted and stored in binary digital form is subject to the laws of the country in which it is located.

Many of the current concerns that surround data sovereignty relate to enforcing privacy regulations and preventing data that is stored in a foreign country from being subpoenaed by the host country's government.

The wide-spread adoption of cloud computing services, as well as new approaches to data storage including object storage, have broken down traditional geopolitical barriers more than ever before. In response, many countries have regulated new compliance requirements by amending their current laws or enacting new legislation that requires customer data to be kept within the country the customer resides.

Verifying that data exists only at allowed locations can be difficult. It requires the cloud customer to trust that their cloud provider is completely honest and open about where their servers are hosted and adhere strictly to service level agreements (SLAs). 

Tags:

General

Windows 7's retirement in 2020

by ronfluegge 6. February 2018 19:29

Jan. 14, 2020 - Microsoft will retire Windows 7 from support, marking the general deadline for enterprises to replace that OS with Windows 10.

There will undoubtedly be laggards – as there were when Windows XP got the axe in April 2014 – and some companies will likely pay to extend support, assuming Microsoft offers what it calls "Premium Assurance" for Windows 7. Currently, Premium Assurance is limited to Windows Server and SQL Server licenses. But Microsoft has just announced that it offers "an option for an additional paid extension for eligible volume licensing customers" for "some versions" of Windows 10 Enterprise and Windows 10 Education.

With that in place – and the strong likelihood that massive numbers of Windows 7 machines will still be in place at this date – Computerworld thinks it's inevitable that Microsoft will dangle a more-money-for-more-support deal in front of organizations unable to dump Windows 7 by the deadline.

Bang-bang control

by ronfluegge 5. January 2018 16:22

Bang-bang control is a type of control system that mechanically or electronically turns something on or off when a desired target (setpoint) has been reached. Bang-bang controllers, which are also known as two-step controllers, on-off controllers or hysteresis controllers, are used in many types of home and industrial control systems (ICS).

An old-fashioned house thermostat, for example, uses bang-bang control. When the temperature drops to a pre-determined low set point, the thermostat switches the heating system on. When the temperature reaches a pre-determined high set point, the thermostat switches the heating system off. Depending upon the set points, this can result in a fairly wide range of acceptable temperatures and cause the heating system to have a fairly long response time. This is why bang-bang controllers are sometimes referred to as hysteresis controllers -- the word hysteresis describes a lag in response to change.

In product development, bang-bang control systems can be contrasted with proportional control systems. A smart thermostat in a hotel room, for example, might determine when there is an error between the setpoint and the current value of the process variable (the room's temperature) and respond to the slight deviation by opening or closing dampers. Proportional controls are more exact and have faster response times than bang-bang, all or nothing controls.

Light switches and dimmer switches also illustrate the difference between bang-bang and proportional controls. A light switch, which can be either on or off, uses bang-bang control. A dimmer switch, in contrast, reduces or increases power to the lighting load in order to achieve a lower or higher light output and uses proportional control.

Tags:

General


Welcome to the GADS Open Source blog!

This will be an easy place to keep up on updates and news related to GADS and the GADS Open Source software.

Check out the FAQ section below as well.